Loading...

Tag Archives: Recycling

New recycling grants on offer in Victoria

New grant opportunities have been announced for Victoria to support projects which aim to promote market demand for recycled-content products.

Grants between $30,000 and $400,000 are available under the new Recycling Victoria Markets Acceleration fund.

Stream 1 of the fund is available to projects which demonstrate and validate new innovative uses for recycled materials. Stream 2 will support activities related to the commercialisation of processes and products containing recycled materials.

Applications for both streams close on Jun 2, 2022.

Additionally the Victorian government announced that applications for the Business Support Fund for circular economy projects will open on the 25th of May. Funding between $50,00 and $1million is available across the two streams.

Stream 1 of the new grant, Business Support Fund – Round 2, will support the development of a circular economy business case. Stream 2 will support the implementation of circular economy business models and practices that avoid waste generation in Victoria.

Applications for both streams close on Jul 7, 2022.

Get in touch for more information and grant application support.

Vote #1 Environment, Promoting Sustainability in Times of Uncertainty

Frequent ‘extreme’ climate disasters, a pandemic and international conflict…the unprecedented has become the precedented. Now more than ever, during times of great uncertainty, governments and businesses must take urgent climate action. This is a wake up call to business, it is startlingly evident that no one is exempt from the impacts of climate change, conflict and Covid. The interconnectedness of commodity markets and global supply chains in our ever-more globalised world, highlighted by the recent energy price shocks and Covid-19 pandemic, will mean flow-on effects will touch every type of business in every location. An intimidating prospect to be sure.

Uncertain times are arguably the best time to change practices and habits. Or better yet, make proactive changes to safeguard and reduce the likelihood of risk before uncertainty. A proactive move now to sustainable practices could minimise the impacts felt by economic disruptions and supply chain collapses due climate disasters, international conflicts and the COVID 19 pandemic. Promoting local manufacturing and trade, incentivising the transition to renewable energy generation and nation-wide targets in line with global leaders of climate action would help to mitigate the inescapable risk of international supply chain collapses, shipping delays, energy uncertainty and economic burden of rising fossil fuel prices.

An opportunity exists, to mitigate these risks, creating a resilient and robust system that is both securing its financial future and remedying past wrong-doings against the environment. The solution to help mitigate climate change is in fact a solution to our future inevitable financial woes. Scientists are still analyzing the correlation of climate change and the severe flooding occurring in New South Wales and Queensland. However we do know that climate change will increase the intensity and frequency of these extreme weather events. There will be huge financial challenges ahead for councils to rebuild their communities, but if we can secure natural assets we can secure markets and future growth. Government and businesses investments in promoting the switch to a cleaner electric vehicle would also mitigate the economic burden felt by rising fuel prices whilst lowering carbon emissions and the use of finite resources. Take a risk lense when looking at sustainability and climate change. For companies,governments and businesses the risk of climate inaction far outweighs the requirements to do something now. What we can see from covid response globally is how easy it can be to adapt.

This time of uncertainty presents some exciting opportunities for all areas of business to make an impact. The sustainability movement is moving beyond the messaging of “please recycle” and “switch off the lights”, to look at core roles within core industries, and how they can impact change. Industry and government need to be change makers and apply a sustainability lense to what they are working through to create benefits that will support business, community and society in these “unprecedented” times. Tangible changes from business and governments such as a switch to renewable energy, creating a carbon management program, changing travel processes, increasing building efficiency, supporting local supply changes can all limit the impacts felt by uncertainty. Funding opportunities and grants are available to businesses, councils and governments to support the progression towards a sustainable economy and society. Our projects at Equilibrium have helped clients deliver impactful changes across a wide range of sectors and service areas. Globalization, industry connections and the broadness of sustainability means impacts are affecting every industry, company and supply chain, everyone has an opportunity to contribute.

Australian clothing reuse export accreditation scheme

Equilibrium has been engaged by Charitable Recycling Australia to explore options for a credible, realistic and transparent process for an Australian clothing reuse export accreditation scheme. Such a scheme is intended to outline standards to promote the significant environmental, economic and social benefits of this important market. The scheme will aim to promote a circular economy, reinforcing repair and reuse of garments to maximize their life cycle before recycling or downcycling of materials is considered.

Feedback and engagement sessions are being run by Equilibrium with Charitable Recycling Australia members, local and state governments and key industry stakeholders. The focus of the program and options will primarily cover:

    >Regulatory compliance management and performance
    >Systems and reporting (including environment, safety and quality)
    >Collection and transport of materials
    >Sorting, dismantling and storage of materials
    >Downstream sale and distribution of recyclable materials
    >Management of supply chain relationships
    >Downstream vendor engagement process, documentation and reporting

The initial program is likely to be a foundation platform to support Charitable Recycling Australia in engaging with collections and export supply chains, leading to an integrated solution to promote a circular economy.

Vote #1 Environment

Australians will be submitting their postal votes and heading to the ballot boxes later this year when the polls open for the 2022 federal election. Climate change and environmental policy will feature as a focal point for this election, with major parties seemingly unable to reconcile strong climate action with economic growth.

To keep you up to date with party policies during this election period Equilibrium will launch our Vote #1 Environment blog. Our blog will review the key policy areas impacting the environment, and summarise what each of the major parties are promising in each area. The main environmental policy areas of interest this election are:

>Energy and Carbon
>Waste and Recycling
>Biodiversity
>ESG Reporting
>Transport

This year, the election focus has shifted from the converging positions of the major parties, to the rise of climate friendly independents to lead the clean energy transition and disrupt the balance of power. Australians are seeking representation by politicians across all parties to take the issue of climate change and the environment seriously and act with urgency. Our blog will present and discuss the policy commitments for each area, so that you can make an informed decision and Vote #1 Environment this election.

Packaging target progress patchy

The Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation (APCO) Collective Impact Report is a presentation and analysis of the current progress towards APCO’s 2025 packaging targets.

Although the report is written using optimistic and positive language, it is reporting significant shortcomings in performance towards APCO’s 2025 targets.

Two of the three key APCO 2025 targets are going in the wrong direction and the “problem” of packaging is, by APCO’s measures, getting worse.

It is notable that the report puts forward actions to address the current gaps.

Thirty new actions have been identified. While inherently good, the 30 new actions beg some questions.

Firstly, there is no explanation in the report on the evidence supporting the actions, so are all 30 actions a priority and how will they be implemented?

Secondly, the 30 new actions are on top of APCO’s business as usual, so is APCO resourced to adequately and effectively fulfill and manage these additional actions?

The report ultimately shows an underperformance so far towards the 2025 targets. In response the report identifies gaps and interventions that can be taken. The issue then comes in the complexity of APCO simultaneously coordinating and completing its current activities, as well as fulfilling the 30 identified actions in the report, in the three years left until the target date.

In terms of the Collection Action Framework, it could do with revamping to ensure that it is still applicable and being utilised effectively.

The report used the Framework as a performance lens to evaluate progress against the targets, but it could really do with an evaluation to ensure that all parties are continuing to fulfill their obligations and requirements under the Australian Packaging Covenant more broadly.

 

Ending Cigarette Butt Litter, A report prepared for WWF

The World Wildlife Fund engaged Equilibrium to investigate solutions to the environmental problem of cigarette filter and butt litter in Australia. Of the 17.8 billion cigarettes currently consumed each year, as much as 8 million end up as litter.  Cigarette butt filters are made from non-bio degradable plastic and can take up to 12 – 15 years to break down into micro plastics. The World Health Organisation has advocated for the elimination of filters as they do not protect against the harms of smoking.

Equilibrium’s report examines the international initiatives and policies to combat cigarette butt waste. Equilibrium concluded that a national ban on plastic cigarette butt filters or a product stewardship scheme would have the greatest impact in reducing cigarette butt litter.

The assessment, research and findings of Equilibrium’s report provide WWF with insight and direction for the potential design of a product stewardship scheme for cigarette butts.

Read Equilibrium’s full report here

Grant opportunities in New South Wales and Victoria

The NSW government has announced four grants available to improve recycling and waste services.  

> Organics Infrastructure: $6 million is available to support the processing of organic waste. This grant is available to local businesses, councils and projects that upgrade, build and expand organics processing infrastructure. Applications close October 21.

> Organics Collection: $12 million is available to support councils and regional organisations tied to councils to divert FOGO waste from kerbside collection. Applications close October 28.

> Circular Solar Grants: $7 million is available for government organisations councils research organisations, industry and not for profits for the development of innovative schemes that recycle and battery waste and solar panels. Applications close November 4.

> Litter Prevention Grants: $2 million is available for community litter reduction projects and schemes. These initiatives could include cigarette butt bin installations or community clean up days. Applications close November 8.

Round two of Innovation Fund grants open for applications in Victoria

In Victoria funding is available to support collaborative projects that aim to design out waste, improving both economic and environmental outcomes. Applications for both streams are open for projects that emphasize action within all phases of a resources’ lifecycle, promoting circular economy initiatives.

The two streams of funding available are:

>Stream One: Textiles Innovation: Between $75,000 – $150,000 of funding is available per project. Grants are available for projects which have a focus on preventing textile waste. Applications are open to industry groups, businesses, charities and research institutions.

> Stream Two: Collaborative Innovation: Between $150,000 and $250,000 of funding is available for each project. Grants are available to businesses, industry groups, charities and research institutions. Projects must have a collaborative focus on preventing waste from multiple organisations within a specific region, supply chain or sector.

The closing date for both Victorian grants is Monday 15th of November at 11:59pm.

Waste Export License

The Australian Government has implemented the Waste Export Ban, and has begun to regulate the export of Australian of certain wastes.

As of July 2021, glass and mixed plastics “waste” are regulated for export. Baled and whole tyres are set to be regulated from the 1st of December and other materials  including cardboard and mixed paper by July 2022. Separate requirements are required for hazardous waste.

Each type of waste stream will have its own regulation start date and rules. To continue to export waste, organisations will have to:

>Meet the requirements and rules or be exempted
>Declare each consignment
>Hold a waste export license for the waste type

Under this ban, exporters and organisations which meet these specific requirements are able to apply for a license to export regulated waste overseas. Waste export licenses are granted for a period of up to three years for organisations who meet certain criteria.

Equilibrium has developed a guide and can help with the waste export license application. For more information please contact us or visit the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment website.

Manufacturing and Life Cycle Assessment

The manufacturing industry plays an important role in global economic development, however it contributes to a significant share of negative environmental impacts in the form of pollution and waste. Manufacturing companies are subject to increasing pressure from consumers and legislation to improve their own activities towards more environmentally conscious manufacturing processes which create less environmentally damaging products. This pressure calls for product designers and production engineers to identify improvement measures for existing manufacturing systems, as well as create innovative concepts for new products. These investigations need to consider the entire life cycle of the manufacturing system and product, including the impacts related to production, use and end of life disposal. 

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool used by companies and product designers to better understand their products’ overall and complete impacts – positive and negative. It helps businesses to quantify impacts at the various stages and provides insights  to improve performance and reduce environmental impacts. 

Why undertake an LCA? There are various reasons:

Stakeholder and consumer expectations: Increasingly consumers are seeking products with reduced environmental impacts, this is reflected in product purchasing choices.
> Industry directions: The manufacturing industry in Australia has a leading role in improving sustainability of its products.
> Voluntary environmental management systems: ISO 14001 is driving continuous improvement and uncovering business efficiency. 

While the key objectives for an LCA often begin with aiming to better understand environmental footprint, the framework can be used to assess other issues including economic and social factors. Examples may include:

> Uncovering production losses, which manufacturing business may refer to as ‘scrap rates’.
> Identifying areas of high energy use, where if savings can be made, will reduce costs and greenhouse emissions.
> Transport and logistics reviews may reveal options to reduce emissions and save costs.
> Raw materials choice for manufacture, including reviewing supplier social procurement practices to protect business reputation.

Businesses that are currently assessing their internal footprint are already on the path to developing an LCA. Examples of this include energy efficiency studies, where energy per unit production helps set a benchmark for assessing business improvements. 

If you would like to know more about LCA’s and how an LCA study may help your business development please contact us.

A simple diagram of life cycle assessment

 

 

Addressing barriers to Product Stewardship in Australia

Product stewardship calls for companies, supply chains and retailers to take greater responsibility for their services and products across their whole life cycle, from design to production to use and, finally, disposal. 

Earlier in July the Product Stewardship Centre of Excellence released a white paper report “Addressing the Barriers: A needs assessment of product stewardship in Australia.” The paper aims to explore and understand the barriers to product stewardship in Australia, investigating opportunities for further development and expansion of product stewardship across the nation.

The paper discusses the major challenge such as free-riders; businesses or organisations that may benefit from product stewardship activity without contributing to the implementation or operation. 

Although not discussed in the paper, the voluntary trend of product stewardship in Australia is also an issue to consider. 

This trend is a particularly Australian phenomenon, as most other countries support regulatory approaches. Australian industry leadership towards product stewardship should be congratulated. For example, the recent announcement of the Australian Toy Association partnering with other leading brands to investigate product stewardship of toys, and the recognition of best practice for Tyre Stewardship Australia are positive developments. 

However, similar to the free-riding organisations, companies and industries who use voluntary as a means to defer, delay or avoid responsibility should be brought to account. 

Voluntary approaches cannot be realistically expected to work in a timely manner where there is no industry agreement and coordination, and where the brand owners are diffuse, have little or no local decision-making authority or are no longer trading. In such cases it at best will be a slow process and many years before some sort of voluntary approach is figured out. 

In general, the need for government intervention is generally greater the more complex the products and supply chain.

For product stewardship broadly to meet community expectations, to reach waste and recycling targets, to discourage free-riders and to support genuine leadership efforts, there therefore needs to be clear market signals that government will regulate when and where needed. 

While the Centre’s white paper correctly highlights key barriers, overcoming them will require the government to act where appropriate to put pressure on industry and ensure accountability, and that includes judicious use of regulatory powers.