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Category Archives: Environment

A dead CERT for greenhouse transparency and accountability

The Clean Energy Regulator (CER) has released new guidelines enabling large greenhouse gas emitting companies to get value from being accountable and transparent.

The Corporate Emissions Reduction Transparency (CERT) program, known as CERT, is for large companies and emitters  to disclose their progress towards meeting their renewable and emissions targets. The CERT will promote company commitments and practices, and be consistent with market developments concerning good Environmental, Social and Government (ESG) practice.

Recent research in a KPMG report, “ Looking Ahead ESG 2030 Predictions” highlighted the ESG movement and momentum. The report outlined that 65% of international dealmakers believe ESG is a key consideration when making investments and in mergers and acquisition decisions, a clear indicator of the universal impacts of good ESG practice and potential of the CERT pilot scheme.

In this phase of the CERT, companies that comply  through National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting can disclose targets and progress in;

> Switching to renewable energy
>Reducing operational greenhouse gas emissions
>Their use of carbon units such as ACCUs, various international carbon units and use of large-scale generation certificate

The pilot phase application period is open from now until January 30, 2022. The CER predicts that future versions of the CERT may allow for non NGER reporters to be involved with the scheme, and may evolve into an important tool to compare business involvement in the voluntary carbon market. For now, companies that participate in the CERT report will be viewed as leading the way in providing a clear picture of actions and performance  to reduce their emissions.

Ending Cigarette Butt Litter, A report prepared for WWF

The World Wildlife Fund engaged Equilibrium to investigate solutions to the environmental problem of cigarette filter and butt litter in Australia. Of the 17.8 billion cigarettes currently consumed each year, as much as 8 million end up as litter.  Cigarette butt filters are made from non-bio degradable plastic and can take up to 12 – 15 years to break down into micro plastics. The World Health Organisation has advocated for the elimination of filters as they do not protect against the harms of smoking.

Equilibrium’s report examines the international initiatives and policies to combat cigarette butt waste. Equilibrium concluded that a national ban on plastic cigarette butt filters or a product stewardship scheme would have the greatest impact in reducing cigarette butt litter.

The assessment, research and findings of Equilibrium’s report provide WWF with insight and direction for the potential design of a product stewardship scheme for cigarette butts.

Read Equilibrium’s full report here

2050 Modelling Shifts Net Zero Leadership to Industry

The Australian Government commitment to net zero emissions by 2050 could well be the embodiment of former Indian Mahatma Ghandi’s famous quote: “There go my people, I must hurry to catch up with them for I am their leader”.

The market has spoken. Business and the community is already moving ahead of Government on greenhouse emissions. Equilibrium has been fortunate to see this first hand as for a number of years it has worked with progressive companies on reducing emissions – and this activity has accelerated over the last 24 months independent of Government.

The Australian Government has now released “Australia’s Long Term Emissions Reduction Plan”. The plan provides a summary of the modelling and analysis which underpins the emissions target of net zero by 2050.

The modelling focuses on industry and businesses taking a voluntary approach to achieve net zero by 2050, without outlining constraints or incentives. This shift to net zero is to be pushed by “investor expectations” and “consumer preferences”. Fortunately, Australian businesses are well advanced in assessing their carbon outputs and are already working towards contributing to the target.

For example, Equilibrium was engaged by a major food manufacture in 2019-2020 to identify their carbon outputs and a carbon reduction plan. The company is now well advanced on a carbon management program that is aligned to its overall business objectives.

The process involved identifying scope 1 emissions (direct emissions eg. production, manufacturing and transport emissions), scope 2 (indirect emissions, emissions that may be generated at another facility) and scope 3 emissions (indirect emissions, employee travel to work/ transport and disposal of waste). The company set a target to achieve net zero emissions in operations and net-zero climate impact across the value chain by 2040, as well as 2025 interim goals to reduce energy, water and waste.

Equilibrium assists businesses with a wide range of services from carbon accounting to Climate Active accreditation. Please get in touch to develop realistic and measurable approaches to reduce your carbon outputs.

Grant opportunities in New South Wales and Victoria

The NSW government has announced four grants available to improve recycling and waste services.  

> Organics Infrastructure: $6 million is available to support the processing of organic waste. This grant is available to local businesses, councils and projects that upgrade, build and expand organics processing infrastructure. Applications close October 21.

> Organics Collection: $12 million is available to support councils and regional organisations tied to councils to divert FOGO waste from kerbside collection. Applications close October 28.

> Circular Solar Grants: $7 million is available for government organisations councils research organisations, industry and not for profits for the development of innovative schemes that recycle and battery waste and solar panels. Applications close November 4.

> Litter Prevention Grants: $2 million is available for community litter reduction projects and schemes. These initiatives could include cigarette butt bin installations or community clean up days. Applications close November 8.

Round two of Innovation Fund grants open for applications in Victoria

In Victoria funding is available to support collaborative projects that aim to design out waste, improving both economic and environmental outcomes. Applications for both streams are open for projects that emphasize action within all phases of a resources’ lifecycle, promoting circular economy initiatives.

The two streams of funding available are:

>Stream One: Textiles Innovation: Between $75,000 – $150,000 of funding is available per project. Grants are available for projects which have a focus on preventing textile waste. Applications are open to industry groups, businesses, charities and research institutions.

> Stream Two: Collaborative Innovation: Between $150,000 and $250,000 of funding is available for each project. Grants are available to businesses, industry groups, charities and research institutions. Projects must have a collaborative focus on preventing waste from multiple organisations within a specific region, supply chain or sector.

The closing date for both Victorian grants is Monday 15th of November at 11:59pm.

Waste Export License

The Australian Government has implemented the Waste Export Ban, and has begun to regulate the export of Australian of certain wastes.

As of July 2021, glass and mixed plastics “waste” are regulated for export. Baled and whole tyres are set to be regulated from the 1st of December and other materials  including cardboard and mixed paper by July 2022. Separate requirements are required for hazardous waste.

Each type of waste stream will have its own regulation start date and rules. To continue to export waste, organisations will have to:

>Meet the requirements and rules or be exempted
>Declare each consignment
>Hold a waste export license for the waste type

Under this ban, exporters and organisations which meet these specific requirements are able to apply for a license to export regulated waste overseas. Waste export licenses are granted for a period of up to three years for organisations who meet certain criteria.

Equilibrium has developed a guide and can help with the waste export license application. For more information please contact us or visit the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment website.

Toy Industry to collaborate and develop sustainability solutions

The Australian Toy Association (ATA) has been supported with a through the Circular Economy Business Innovation Centre (CEBIC) delivered by Sustainability Victoria. This is a world first for the toy industry and another example of an industry taking responsibility for its products.

In collaboration with leading toy industry brands and retailers, the funding enables the ATA to develop and investigate circular economy options for toys. The project’s first stage will develop a material flows analysis, building an understanding of the movement of toys through the economy. The results of the analysis will link into the overarching project to develop solutions that will reduce the environmental impact of toys. 

Equilibrium congratulates ATA for their leadership and vision and is excited to partner with them on this project in developing circular economy options for toys.

New environmental laws in Victoria from July 1 2021

EPA Victoria will have increased powers from 1 July 2021 to prevent harm to public health and the environment from pollution and waste. 

The laws include sweeping changes which transforms EPA powers and requirements for business owners and operators. It is the responsibility of all business directors and managers to understand the new laws and how to comply. It is also your responsibility to make sure all employees understand requirements under the new laws.

One of the more pivotal and central changes is the introduction of the General Environmental Duty (GED). The GED is all-inclusive, applying to all businesses in Victoria, irrespective of size or type of operation. In short, under the GED, all Victorian businesses and organisations must take action to protect the environment and human health.

For many businesses in Victoria environmental risk management is already embedded into everyday operations, and the GED should require minimal change. However, now is the time to review systems against the new laws and be confident of compliance. It will be important to keep risk registers and risk management plans up to date and:

>Ensure environmental risk of pollution to land, air or water is assessed for all business activities.
>Action plans are in place to eliminate or control risks.
>Actions are implemented in a timely manner, and effectiveness monitored.
>Keep documented records of risk assessments and action plans to demonstrate

EPA Victoria provides guides and tools to help businesses comply with the GED, including:

>EPA Self-Assessment Tool – for supporting small business with action planning
>Assessing and Controlling Risk Business Guide – risk management framework for business
>Managing low risk activities
guidance for businesses with low risk, e.g. offices, cafes, retail.

ARENA launch $43 million Industrial Energy Transformation Studies Program

The Australian Renewable Energy Agency announced a $43 million grant program on behalf of the federal government to assist in identifying methods to cut industrial energy costs and emissions. The first round of the Industrial Energy Transformation Studies Program will offer $25 million to assist research and the development of business case projects for organisations in the mining, agriculture, manufacturing sectors, water supply, gas supply, waste services and data centres. Applicants can apply under one of two rounds: 

>Round 1A – Feasibility Studies (Up to $10 million available). Grants can be between $100,000 and $500,00 for up to 75% of eligible project costs
>Round 1B –
Engineering Studies (up to $15 million available). Grants can be between $250,000 and $5 million for up to 50% of eligible project costs.

The program aims to fund studies that deliver transformational improvements in de-carbonisation technology and energy efficiency practices for industry. Eligible projects must also demonstrate high replicability potential across similar industry settings.

Applications for the initial round of funding will be open on the 6th of July.

ARENA will be hosting separate information sessions for Round 1A and Round 1B in the week commencing 12 July, further information regarding these information sessions will be published on the Industrial Energy Transformation Studies Program website in the coming weeks.

MMI open for recycling and clean energy manufacturing grants

Earlier this month, the federal government announced a series of Modern Manufacturing Initiative (MMI) grants for major recycling and clean energy projects. The government is inviting applications under its Recycling and Clean Energy stream, offering grants on average of $4 million, ranging from $1 million to $20 million. The $1.3 billion in funding will assist manufacturers to scale up, commercialise and collaborate.

The MMI grant stream is now open and made up of two separate funding opportunities; 

>Manufacturing translation component: will assist manufacturers in expressing their ideas into commercial outcomes and encourage investment in non R&D innovation.
>Manufacturing integration component: will assist in commercializing innovative concepts, integrating into local and domestic supply chains.

The government has outlined examples of the grants, addressing the funding suitability to include activities which aim to enable greater use of recycled materials across supply chains, and/or that promote increased use of clean energy within their industrial systems.

Applications for these grants close on the 5th of May and businesses must provide co – funding.

National Plastics Plan maps longer term approach

The Australian Government last week launched the National Plastics Plan to reduce plastics waste through a multi aspect approach, looking at both the upstream and downstream methods to limit plastic waste. The plan aims to help ensure Australia meets its waste targets, prompting government to work alongside essential industry and other supply chain holders. The plan outlines wide ranging initiatives, acting on five different fronts;

  • > Prevention: Addressing plastics at the source, phasing out packaging products that do not meet the relevant compostable standards, plastic free beach initiatives, prompting industry shift to easily recyclable plastics and national packaging targets.
    >Recycling: Introduction of waste export bans, product stewardship programs, enforcing material performance standards and national packaging targets.
    >Consumer education: Achieve consistency in kerbside bin collections, container deposit schemes and better recycling information for consumers.
    >Plastics in our oceans and waterways: Take actions to reduce plastics leaking into the environment, such as pursuing a global coordinated action on marine litter and micro plastic pollution and initiating industry led cigarette butt litter stewardship schemes.
    >Research: Investment into new data systems and plastic technologies, designed to track how plastic flows through our economy. Develop a circular economy and roadmap and distribute cooperative research centre projects grants.

To read the plan in detail, visit The National Plastics Plan.